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globalization creat big bad impact to philippine educational system

what are these bad implications of globalization to the philippine educational system

Posted by: buena c. mora
Date posted: Apr 01,2009
Replied by: king jehu II | Date replied: Jan 13,2011

Globalization opens wide variety of global opportunities: international employment, exports and imports, information and technlogy transfer, etc.

Despite all the nerve racking issues that it has confronted in these present days; its oppotunities are now the mainstream of the other nation's economic development.

A nations economic development is always coupled with the development of the educational system. Globalization's "threat" to education should be considered in the lightstream of opportunity for Philippine education system to improve, thus,this nation will not be left behind with the other nation's development by offcourse not compromising the loss of the Filipino culture, including their native language.

The archipelagic location of the Philippines, I believed, it influence the Filipino's multilingual skills and fluency in English, and I really believed that this will be accepted as the nation's core competence compared to other Asian countries.


Improving the Philippine eductaion system can somehow be done through matching, that is, match the education offered to the Filipino that will enhance their global competency while at the same time conserving their culture.

God Bless!


Replied by: Katherine | Date replied: Dec 09,2010

Globalization is the brand of today. The boom of globalization has opened gates for economies both nationwide and worldwide. For the last decade’s governments get hold of the systems in taking advantage of the opportunities for international business as well as venture. Where there are some highly appreciated benefits of globalization to the world has witnessed some extremely harmful effects of globalization too especially when talking about Education.

The effects of globalization on education bring about fast expansions in technology and communications are anticipating changes within learning systems across the world as ideas, values, and knowledge, changing the roles of students and teachers and producing change in society from industrialization towards an information-based society. In the 21st century, education systems deal with the twofold challenge of providing students with the new knowledge, skills and values needed to be competitive in a global market while at the same time producing graduates who are responsible adults, good citizens both of their country and of the world. Thus globalization challenges us to rethink not only how much education is needed but also its ultimate purposes.



Replied by: RONNIE SANDATA | Date replied: Oct 14,2010

The notion of globalization and its relation to education is widely being discussed among politicians, philosophers, scholars, educators and students throughout the world. Some fully reject and refuse to accept this phenomenon, others try to understand and accept this notion, and still others completely accept the idea of globalization and associate with it all progressive changes in the new century’s socio-cultural and educational space. Moreover, for a considerable part of the planet’s residents the very spirit of the terms “globalism” and “globalization” still remains an unknown, enigmatic, almost supernatural entity. The contemporary globalizing epoch is characterized by pervasive events making a considerable affect on human development, human consciousness and on various aspects of education and child development. These events include: (1) the unprecedented emergence and dissemination of information and knowledge; (2) the digitization of information and virtualization of objective reality; (3) the spreading of the English language as an essential global tool for education and international communication; (4) the dissemination of the ideas of global and multicultural education; (5) the rise of the European Union; (6) the market orientation of Russian and the former entities of the former Socialist block;(7) the spreading of the cultural and educational canons of the Anglo-American or Atlantic civilization upon other cultures and civilizations; and (9) unparalleled demographic growth, especially in Eastern and Southern cultures.


Replied by: quimberly ann | Date replied: Mar 15,2010

..all of yOur comment are good enough and i think the bad implications of globalization to the philippine educational system can be change by means of our own effective teachers..teachers are the foundation of everyone's life


Replied by: Mayah Khan | Date replied: Nov 11,2009

Learning English as i think is a good factor for us Filipinos. since it is the international language it gives as an advantage from other Asian countries.

Globalization as i think has played as an effective contributor to development. Especially to those developed states. But mind you of the case of the third world countries like Philippines.

Globalization helps in the development of the country but most it has a great contribution to the underdevelopment of the Philippines.

Globalization has great impact on the political, economic, cultural, and environmental aspect of the country. Political, since their is the interaction of the Philippines with other developed states like United States, their is also the weakening of the Philippine political system because U.S tend to intervene the decisions of the Philippine government, there is the growth and expansion of international non governmental ion that also tend to intervene the political system, there is also the growth of local regional and decentralized forms of government because other ethnic groupings are trying to preserve their identity from what they see as globalizing and threatening world.Also one observable impact of globalization is on the economic aspect, for those developed countries there is the fast approach of the economic growth of their country but not in the case of the third world countries like the Philippines, yes, there is the increase, but not much as the continuous increase of the debt of the Philippines , and the rise of poverty rate, and unemployment rate, there is the dumping of surplus of the developed nations to the Philippines, this cause the death or turn down of local industries, in the cultural aspect, there is the lose of the identity of the Filipinos because the Filipino nationalism is weak and since Philippines is open with other countries in term of economy and culture, Filipinos tend to adopt other countries culture.










Replied by: Gabriela | Date replied: Oct 23,2009

After reading the thoughtful comments shared by the participants in this important conversation, I am beginning to see globalization from a different perspective.

Initially viewing it from the lens of the Western world, I believed that globalization was a link to communication, access to resources, and diverse ways of thinking. Viewing it as a Filipino, I would have to say that globalization is two-faced. While it has provided access to employment, it has also encouraged exploitation of labor. While it has opened the door to opportunities in other countries, it has also encouraged exporting of our human resources. While it has invited international communication, it also becomes apparent that this kind of communication benefits only those who have access.

I have yet to continue examining the impact of globalization on the life of the Filipinos. While globalization offers a world of possibilities, it also opens issues that relate to social justice, particularly to those who are not advantaged by the system.

Gabriela


Replied by: obed dela cruz | Date replied: Jun 06,2009

but the educational system may change through finding great teachers with patience


Replied by: emil_samaniego | Date replied: May 13,2009

the fact is... currently numerous numbers of liberals are employed in the DepEd..


Friedrich Naumann says... | Date replied: Mar 17,2009

Many critics of globalization in third world countries, including the Philippines, would agree with Mr. Rizal’s comment on 25 Aug. 2008:

“… the Philippines seems to be scraping the barrels of progress of the first world countries. We are actually victims of globalization. The only people who have say on globalization are the big countries.”

In comparing us with developed countries it is very easy to see the discrepancies, and even easier to blame globalization as the cause for that. But if you look into the history of these “big countries,” you will see that globalization had a lot to do with their development. To learn more about what these benefits are, we suggest you read a booklet by Johann Norberg called Globalisation and the Poor at:
http://www.fnf.org.ph/downloadables/Globalisation%20and%20the%20Poor.pdf Alternatively, you may also browse the Liberal Library section of our Website: http://www.fnf.org.ph/liberallibrary/index.htm where you will see other articles on globalization as well.

One of the main accusations critics of globalization like to hurl is exactly what Mr. Rizal pointed out: “big countries like China, exploit our natural resources for their own benefit: big marine vessels fish on our seas, metal corporations mine for minerals in a lot of provinces, etc.” However, Filipinos themselves are no slouches when it comes to exploiting our natural resources as well. Just think of the many Filipino dynamite fishers that destroy fish and coral reefs wantonly, illegal loggers, small-scale miners that use toxic chemicals with abandon, or indeed the many Filipinos who throw their trash into canals, creeks, rivers, etc. Another example is the politicians in Boracay who have still not been able to come up with a proper sewage treatment plant. Instead, they fight about land and enable reckless construction. It is clear that exploitation is local as much as it is international. And since that is the case, the reason countries or people exploit anything is NOT because of globalization. It happens because there is a breakdown in the enforcement of the rule of law.

If you think about it and look around our country, you will notice that one of the main reasons we are not improving is because of the weakness of our laws. Just as our politics is ruled by personality so too are our laws, courts and regulatory bodies fall before this. There are studies after studies confirming this weakness, and it has nothing whatsoever to do with globalization, and everything to do with Filipino political and legal culture.

Another charge against globalization is that it is “the new form of colonialization.” Hence Mr. Rizal’s questioning the word “order” in our quote:

"Globalization is the increased interaction between people around the globe, be it economical, political, cultural or social. It is spurred by the decreased price of communication, information, travel and transport, as well as by a relatively stable international order."

However, when we said “order” we simply meant “order” as in “stability,” ”peace,” etc. We nevertheless acknowledge that many see globalization as a new form of western dominance. But that fear is unfounded. One of the benefits of globalization is the access to ideas and practices. We all have something to learn from each other, and only we as individuals can determine which of these we shall keep and which we shall discard. The only people who have something to fear form the influx of new things are those who wish to protect the status quo and prevent people from deciding for themselves, believing they know what is best. No one knows what is best for you except you. And the concept of learning to decide for ourselves is brought to us by globalization.

As to Mr. Rizal’s other comment on call centers: “it may seem to be a very lucrative job for those who want a better paycheck than a minimum-wage-paying-job, but it is actually a hazardous and dead-end career.” We disagree. It sounds pretty cynical when you consider that the alternative for many is indeed unemployment, a minimum-wage job or emigration. There are many people who don’t mind working at call centers. If not, there would not be many in that profession, and many who climb up from the ranks of agent, to trainee to team leader, etc. No one forced them to take on that role, and should they be unhappy, they could always resign. If there were also better alternatives available, they would seek those out.

But the local economy is not providing many jobs that are more attractive than the globalization-induced call center job. Since much of the investment for these jobs comes from abroad, there is also no case to be made that this is a misallocation of domestic capital. Lastly, there is a good reason why the current term for the industry is Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), not call centers. Globalization has indeed led to the outsourcing of more than just simple call center functions. It has created opportunities for a much wider range of professionals.

As to it being hazardous, being a pedestrian in the Philippines is even more dangerous. But on a more serious note, it is unfair to compare a call center job with a hypothetical ideal job. You have to compare it to the alternatives actually available in the Philippines – and most of these are probably significantly more hazardous.

With regards to his further comment of:

“And furthermore, it is also a way to influence Filipinos to speak English since it equates to economic incentives. The point is, if we continue to think that English is the better medium than Filipino, then what would happen to our already confused national identity? When there is confusion, it easier to break the morale of a person, or even a country as seen in previous defeats and conquer of nations. Furthermore, what would happen to our culture? What would set us apart from other countries?”

What is the outcry against Filipinos speaking English, and speaking it well? It is an asset to speak English. The Chinese are placing a lot of effort to learn it. Koreans are flocking to our country to master English. Like it or not, English is the global language. The Chinese or the Koreans are not disparaging the learning of English nor are they saying that it will destroy their identity. Indeed, there is no duality in this. Learning English does not equate forgetting to speak Filipino or forgetting that we are Filipino. Our culture is more than just our language – especially since the Philippines is a nation of many languages. Our culture is who we are as a people, it is made up of faith, values, beliefs, sense of aesthetics, music, dance, sports, drama, history, myths, relationships, courtship, love, family, clan, province, island, administrative structure, political system, communication and thousand other things, including our linguistic heterogeneity.

It is good to know that Mr. Rizal is an OFW. The opportunity to be so is due to globalization. His working abroad is a sign of openness and acceptance to new ideas and skills and the ease of travel between countries. As much as he criticizes globalization, he has benefited from it.


Replied by: ruqia noren | Date replied: Jan 23,2009

i m also agree with these


Replied by: xtelle_0999 | Date replied: Oct 14,2008

..Educational institutions have the moral responsibility to develop leaders and educated citizens living in both a national and a global world. Essentially, these learning centers must promote responsible citizenship, ethical behavior and global integration. Educational mentors must ensure that their students are equipped with a core body of knowledge and a critical eye to see social and economic developmental programs from a wider perspective. Education in our country should take the lead to properly mold the future of our mortherland.


Replied by: Paul Matthew | Date replied: Oct 01,2008

The only reason that Philippines always left behind is because most Filipinos aren't open to adopt foreign culture.

I, as a 19 year old Filipino who lives in a foreign country, learned that Filipinos, like me, musn't enclose themselves into the culture that we usually do. Learning English isn't about abandoning what our heros fought for, but moving forward to a better life.



Replied by: maureen | Date replied: Sep 23,2008

As a student, i really confused of what is going on in the country because all the while after hearing the words and letters by our heroes we are eager to do the same thing even a little things on our behalf but when we think to the world today. There something going on. We couldn't deny the fact that we are aiming for a better life, to land a good job, will earn a higher amount of salary! However, we do always have our own principles inside that confront us as a young citizen in the country. our educational system has not been serving the basic needs of the country - but is focused on producing college graduates for "export" to sustain the economy that is very dependent on remittances from ofws. it does not give our young students better choices or options through alternative paths such as a vocational study in a manner similar to the vocational or dual system in europe.




Replied by: javerey | Date replied: Sep 08,2008

SEveral arguements arises each day regarding the impact of globalization in our country... Firstly, it gives a big issue on the educational approach in which Mr. Manny Villar points out on the English language utilization in every schools in the Philippines. Well me myself cannot blame the fact that we are bound to work abroad cause what progress can we expect in this country, right? like for example, a no ending increase in gasoline, petroleum and so on but uncompensated wages and salaries thats why almost graduate students with corresponding professional fields prefer to go abroad. If those issues doesnt exist and given intervention, why bother to learn English.


Replied by: jose rizal | Date replied: Aug 26,2008

In a lot of ways, it is true how the Philippines has benefited from globalization: BPOs, increased dollar remittances from OFWs, increased exports, etc.

Quoting from Mr. Naumann, "Globalization is the increased interaction between people around the globe, be it economical, political, cultural or social. It is spurred by the decreased price of communication, information, travel and transport, as well as by a relatively stable international order."

But the the question is, who dictates this order?

Globalization, in its truest sense, must show that we are a united world equal in every opportunity. BUT the Philippines seems to be scraping the barrels of progress of the first world countries. We are actually victims of globalization. The only people who have say on globalization are the big countries. Globalization is the new form of colonialization.

Take a look at how big countries like China, exploit our natural resources for their own benefit: big marine vessels fish on our seas, metal corporations mine for minerals in a lot of provinces, etc. And in the case of call centers, it may seem to be a very lucrative job for those who want a better paycheck than a minimum-wage-paying-job, but it is actually a hazardous and dead-end career. And furthermore, it is also a way to influence Filipinos to speak English since it equates to economic incentives.

The point is, if we continue to think that English is the better medium than Filipino, then what would happen to our already confused national identity? When there is confusion, it easier to break the morale of a person, or even a country as seen in previous defeats and conquer of nations. Furthermore, what would happen to our culture? What would set us apart from other countries?

OFWs seem to be the best people to ask as to what being a Filipno is since they seem to celebrate more the Philippine holidays than most Filpinos do who are actually in the Philippines. They seem to know more of the Filipino customs and traditions. I'm an OFW myself and sometimes I wonder whether what I know of the Philippines is true or maybe everything is just an illusion once I go back to the Philippines.


Replied by: kent | Date replied: Aug 08,2008

I agree with all of what this people say about globalization happening here in Philippines.
Byt only thing I disagree is that by using English Here in our Country even if we talked in public.
Why is it that when we Filipinos gone to other country, we fource to use English, bt if the foriegners came to our place, we also use English?


Replied by: Mr. Jam | Date replied: Jul 26,2008

I agree with the argument of Mr. Naumann for it is quite true that we as a Filipino must also learn how to speak english fluently, we cannot deny the fact we are actually loosing our competency in speaking english and that the philippine educational system must really have to implement strictly the english language as the medium of instruction because this is one of the basic yet the best way to make every Filipino citizen globally competative..


Friedrich Naumann says... | Date replied: Apr 01,2008

Globalization is not to blame for the problems of the Philippine educational system. It is in fact because of it that we realize how behind our educational structure is compared to the rest of the world. The goal of education is to equip us with skills that will enable us to think for ourselves and to maximize our potential.

Philippine education is not doing that, and it is not because of a ?trade off for more in-demand jobs abroad,? as Rose argues. Those jobs along with those available here, including call centers and IT-related ones, need a host of competencies that are created from a well-rounded, solid education. It is not only about speaking English fluently. Our education system is simply deteriorating rapidly. A lot of it has to do with the bureaucracy of the Department of Education and politics; not because it wants to ?export? graduates.

But we won?t discuss the problems of our education system in this post; we shall leave that to an expert. If you are interested, please listen to International Institute of Rural Reconstruction President Mike Luz as he talks about the five disconnects in Philippine education on our podcast number 19 at http://www.fnf.org.ph/podcast/archive5.html.

Let?s focus instead on globalization and its positive effects. Globalization allows easy access and transfer of new ideas, best practices and personnel from around the world. A good example is what Rose has pointed out ? the vocational education system in Europe. Her understanding of the dual system is precisely a benefit of globalization. However, globalization is just the starting point, a guide or signpost in developing our country. The hard work rests with us. We have the choice whether or not to make use of the wealth of information it bring us.

Replied by: Rose | Date replied: Dec 20,2007

in my opinion, globalization has very negative effects on philippine educational system. basic skills and competence which shuld be developed at the basic education level are being traded off for the more "in-demand abroad" higher education courses such as IT and Call Center. the government fails to see the consequences of their investment - that is insufficient mastery of literacy skills, let alone science and math, among the young people who actually comprises more than 35% of the country's population

our educational system has not been serving the basic needs of the country - but is focused on producing college graduates for "export" to sustain the economy that is very dependent on remittances from ofws. it does not give our young students better choices or options through alternative paths such as a vocational study in a manner similar to the vocational or dual system in europe.


Friedrich Naumann says... | Date replied: Apr 01,2008

Philippine society has many problems. The easiest and most available excuse is globalization. This arises from a misunderstanding of what this phenomenon is all about. Globalization is the increased interaction between people around the globe, be it economical, political, cultural or social. It is spurred by the decreased price of communication, information, travel and transport, as well as by a relatively stable international order. In some ways, it is a process that is thousands of years old and dates back to the time when people started to trade over long distances. The Philippines as an island nation has been part of this saga for thousand years, and its rich composite culture is a product of it. With about 10 percent of Filipinos working abroad and a booming BPO sector at home, the country continues to play an integral role in the process. As in all human endeavors, there are positive and negative sides to this phenomenon, but overall globalization is a positive development because it spurs innovation and competition which encourages growth and progress. There is no rich country that became wealthy through isolating itself.

Mr. Villamar argues that the government?s focus on English as the medium of instruction is due to an outcropping of globalization. The reality is a bit more nuanced than that. English took root, of course, due to the colonial rule of the US, but it has remained important partly because it fulfils the role of a link language in a country that is linguistically very heterogeneous. Filipino has not been able to supplant it in that role as many Filipinos see English as more ?neutral? than Filipino which is associated especially with the Tagalog-speaking provinces.

Globalization, of course, has reinforced the usefulness of English as it has become the unofficial world language, and this can be observed in practically every country. In the context of globalization, it is certainly not detrimental to the country if Filipinos speak fluent English. This would help us become more competitive and give us an edge over our Asian neighbors. Look at China. Not only is it redefining itself for the global market through establishing infrastructures, it is heavily pushing its people to learn English.

Why would learning English lead to the demise of the Filipino language? Filipinos are gifted linguists. There are many Filipinos who fluently speak Filipino, local dialects, English and even another foreign language. Knowledge of other languages does not impede each other. Ask any linguist and they will tell you that they can switch effortlessly from one language to another.

English as the medium of instruction in school does not automatically guarantee that our children will forget Filipino. They will only forget it if we don?t develop the Philippine language. That is exactly what is happening in the case of Taglish.

What we are seeing with the rise of Taglish is the failure of young people to learn English correctly, and to develop a sense of linguistic discipline. Each language has unique features, and people who speak several know that certain things can be better expressed in one language than in another. The temptation to mix languages is all too real. We do need a certain discipline not to give in to that temptation, and school is the best place to start that. Unfortunately, it?s not happening right now.

Instead of complaining about English as the medium of instruction in public schools, we should focus our energies on teaching Filipino and English properly and in keeping them distinct. There is, moreover, a legitimate argument about the role of the mother tongue in school, and about the appropriate time and method of introducing a second ? and third ? language. In the Philippines, more than 50 percent do not speak Filipino as their mother tongue. Education policy therefore has to strike a fine balance between vernacular languages, the national language and the informal global language. Neither can be excluded without doing serious harm, and they should be cultivated in their distinct form. Moreover, the temptation to play identity politics with them should be avoided. Most people have multiple identities and multiple needs of interaction.

Whether we like it or not, English has become the language of economic opportunity. If we deny the public sector school children the chance to attain full proficiency in English, the economic opportunities will continue to be cornered by the children of the more affluent who pay for private schools that teach in English. This is already happening. Not just here, but also, e.g., in India and Bangladesh where English was sidelined in the public schools for ideological reasons. The results were counterproductive. It increased the marginalization of the poor rather than ameliorating it. That?s why education systems worldwide seek to improve the access of all children to attain a high level of English proficiency. To do otherwise would harm the poor and limit their chances for social mobility

Replied by: melanie | Date replied: Oct 16,2007

After reading the comment of Mr. Villamar that's exactly what i wanted to point out.
As a student, i really confused of what is going on in the country because all the while after hearing the words and letters by our heroes we are eager to do the same thing even a little things on our behalf but when we think to the world today. There something going on. We couldn't deny the fact that we are aiming for a better life, to land a good job, will earn a higher amount of salary! However, we do always have our own principles inside that confront us as a young citizen in the country.
PATRIOTIC.


Replied by: lawrence villamar | Date replied: Aug 28,2007

Globalization has always been a double-edge sword; it has its advantage and disadvantage.

Let me point out that a minor 'bad' effect of globalization to the educational system is the current attempt of the government to endorse English as the medium of instruction in its educational institution, much to the demise of the development of the Filipino language. Many had interpreted this as a manifestation of current BPO capital influx which encourages fluency in the English language. that way the proficiency of Filipinos in English is maintained if not improved, and thus, basically, assures them a career in the BPO and in a larger sense, makes the country a more BPO business-friendly hub.

While this scheme benefits the economy as a whole, it is obviously at the expense of the Filipino language. Globalization affects the education system of the Philippines, by posing a constraints to the government to make its citizens more globalize, that is, adaptive and accomodating to the language of the globalist: ENGLISH



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